Available Modules for Purchase

  1. 5s

A Lean operation produces just what is needed, when it is needed with no additional labor, costs, inventory, or time. Learn the skills necessary to apply Lean techniques to reduce waste and improve process efficiency. Gain a practical understanding of Lean continuous improvement techniques and how to use them to reduce errors, inventory, and production lead time. This module will:

  • Define Lean, its importance, benefits, and objectives. 
  • Describe Lean tools, methodologies, and levels of deployment. 
  • Identify the roles and responsibilities of the Lean implementation team. 
  • Discuss how these roles can be integrated into an organization.

In the office and service environments, Lean improvement activities focus on eliminating waste and speeding up the process. This is accomplished by eliminating idle time, bureaucracy, and unnecessary redundancy. Lean Office and Service also helps organizations understand and predict changes in customer expectations, thereby enabling them to react quickly to meet customer needs. This module will:

  • Discuss why Lean Office and Service is important to an organization’s long-term success. 
  • Discuss common obstacles organizations face when implementing Lean Office and Service and how to overcome them. 
  • Discuss the relationship between some important Lean tools, including process mapping, service family matrixes, and Value Stream Analysis, and demonstrate how to apply them.

Producing anything that the customer doesn’t want or need is waste. It lowers your profits and leaves you less competitive in your market. Learn about the waste that is hidden, or taken for granted, in both manufacturing and office environments. Utilizing Lean techniques can help to dramatically reduce these wastes and their associated costs. This module will:

  • Describe Value Add versus Non-Value Add activities and explain why they are important in a Lean implementation. 
  • Identify the Eight Wastes and discuss why they are a primary focus during Lean implementation. 
  • Describe each of the Eight Wastes in detail and give examples.

Voice of the customer (VOC) is used to describe the in-depth process of capturing a customer's expectations, preferences and aversions. This process is all about being proactive and constantly innovative to capture the changing requirements of the customers with time. It produces a detailed set of customer wants and needs, organized into a hierarchical structure, and then prioritized in terms of relative importance and satisfaction with current alternatives. Voice of the Customer studies typically consist of both qualitative and quantitative research steps. This module will:

  • Describe methods on how to translate the Voice of the Customer (VOC) into measurable requirements. 
  • Explain how to apply a 5-step method for setting up and conducting a VOC study. 
  • Discuss techniques that are used to identify process variables which are correlated to customer requirements.

5s

5S is a technique that results in a workplace that is clean, uncluttered, safe, and well organized. The 5S pillars provide a methodology for organizing, cleaning, developing, and sustaining a productive work environment. A 5S environment has “a place for everything and everything in its place,” with all tools and materials ready where and when they are needed. Learn how 5S can help reduce waste and optimize productivity in any work environment. This module will:

  • Discuss 5S and describe its overall purpose and benefits, and identify the five phases of its process. 
  • For each phase, drill down to discuss key objectives, tools or methods used to reach those objectives, and the benefits achieved. 
  • Introduce a sixth "S," Safety.

Value Stream Mapping is an essential planning tool used to identify improvements that will result in a Lean Value Stream. The first step is to create the Current State map, showing the Value Stream of a particular product or service. This module will:

  • Define Value Stream and Product Family. 
  • Explain how to identify Product Families from groups of products. 
  • Describe a Current State Value Stream Map and discuss its purpose. 
  • Walk through the steps of creating a Current State Value Stream Map.
  • Identify commonly used symbols; and describe how metrics are collected and represented.

The goal of a Lean Value Stream is to produce the product or complete the process in the shortest Lead Time, at the highest quality and at the lowest cost possible, in order to deliver the highest level of customer satisfaction. After the Current State Value Stream Map has been created, the next step is to analyze the current process and flow to develop a clear vision of the desired Future State. In order for an organization to complete its Lean transformation process, it must understand the desired end goal. This module will:

  • Define a Future State Value Stream Map and describe its purpose. 
  • Define and calculate Takt Time, and discuss its role in Value Stream Mapping. 
  • Demonstrate how to analyze a Current State Value Stream Map to create a Future State Value Stream Map. 
  • Discuss how to enable flow and develop Pull.

A3 Problem Solving is a means of capturing all stages of a problem - identification, analysis, review, solution planning, and project management - on one A3 sized (11"x17") piece of paper. A3 Problem Solving facilitates visual tracking of a project. This module will:

  • Show the importance of observation for Lean process improvement; 
  • Describe the A3 Report as a problem-solving and communication tool; 
  • Demonstrate how the Plan-Do-Check-Act, or PDCA, cycle is an integral part of A3; 
  • Explain the concept of Going to Gemba.
  • Walk through the steps for completing an A3 Report, including key questions to ask at each stage.
  • Discuss what makes a good A3.

Kaizen Events are highly effective team events that focus on achieving rapid results. Kaizen teams use various analytical and Lean techniques, such as Value Stream Mapping, Changeover Reduction, 5S, Total Productive Maintenance, and Workplace Design to implement rapid improvements. This module will:

  • Define Kaizen Event and discuss its purpose and application. 
  • Explain how Kaizen Events can provide rapid business benefits and accelerate the execution of larger initiatives.
  • Walk you through the structured approach for running Kaizen Events, in both office and manufacturing processes.

Visual Management is the establishment of a workplace where performance conditions can be understood by sight. Problem areas are highlighted so employees can take immediate action to eliminate waste. One of the most important benefits of a visual workplace is that even someone unfamiliar with the process can see what is happening, identify errors, and tell if anything is out of place or missing. This module will:

  • Define Visual Management and describe its purpose and benefits. 
  • Introduce the three characteristics of Visual Management – Self Explaining, Self Regulating, and Self Improving – and discuss why they are important. 
  • Describe the difference between Visual Controls and Visual Displays, giving examples of each

Standard Work is an essential building block of a Lean Enterprise. It helps ensure that each step in the process is clearly defined so that work can be performed repeatedly in the same manner. Variations in processes result in mistakes or other quality problems that require inspection and rework. This module will:

  • Define Standard Work from a Lean perspective.
  • Discuss its business benefits; explain why it is the basis for improvement. 
  • Explain how to create, implement, and improve Standard Work for both office and manufacturing processes.
  • Describe the GRPI Model and how to use it throughout the project. 
  • Apply the ARMI tool to clearly define stakeholder roles.
  • Illustrate and complete a Project Charter.
  • Conduct a stakeholder analysis.
  • Plan the project, identify necessary resources, and discuss the different project roles.
  • Explain the team dynamics necessary to be a Change Leader.

Error Proofing is used to ensure products and processes are completed correctly the first time. The goal of error proofing is to prevent the occurrence of defects and to ensure that mistakes are detected when they occur. Because people can make mistakes even in inspection, error proofing often relies on mechanisms built into tools or systems that automatically signal when problems occur or prevent the process from continuing until the proper conditions are met. This module will:

  • Define Error Proofing from a Lean perspective. 
  • Describe its business benefits. 
  • Discuss how it can improve quality and reduce failures and omissions. 
  • Illustrate the 6-Step error proofing process and how to apply it. 
  • Explain how to implement Error Proofing for both office and manufacturing processes.

Changeover Reduction is a structured methodology and technique used to reduce the combined amount of set-up and start-up time it takes to change a process from running one product to running the next one It is one of the fundamental techniques in Lean manufacturing and a key to waste reduction. This module will:

  • Define Changeover Reduction. 
  • Provide a brief overview of its origin. 
  • Discuss its benefits, and explain how it supports and enables Lean waste reduction. 
  • Define Takt time. 
  • Distinguish between external and internal work, and discuss the relevance of each. 
  • Provide a step-by-step guide to implementing a successful Changeover Reduction program.

Creating high performance work spaces or manufacturing cells involves much more than moving machines and people closer together. Well designed work places eliminate waste and help to optimize material, people, and information flow. The work flows in alignment with value streams rather than according to functional teams or departments. This module will:

  • Describe how Lean Workplace Design differs from traditional approaches. 
  • Discuss its business benefits. 
  • Show how it is used to improve quality and reduce lead times.
  • Explain how to create effective Workplace Design for office and manufacturing processes.

The concept of “Pull” in a Lean office or factory means to respond to the pull, or demand, of the customer. Lean companies design their operations and processes to respond to the ever-changing requirements of customers. This module will:

  • Define Continuous or One Piece Flow and the introductory aspects of Pull Systems. 
  • Explain where to implement Pull Systems. 
  • Discuss how they enable effective flow of information and materials, and identify which tools are best suited for various office and manufacturing environments. 
  • Explain how to apply Pull Systems in a comprehensive and systematic way.

Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) is a team and shop floor based initiative focused on optimizing the effectiveness of manufacturing equipment. TPM helps workers efficiently care for the equipment and machines they work with, which will reduce costs, including money and space tied up with spare parts inventory. This module will:

  • Describe the primary benefits gained from Total Productive Maintenance. 
  • Identify the four major categories of maintenance. 
  • Define Overall Equipment Effectiveness.

The Theory of Constraints (TOC) is a system improvement philosophy developed by Dr. Eliyahu M. Goldratt. TOC explains that the three ways for a company to make money are by reducing operating expenses, reducing inventory, and increasing throughput. This module will:

  • Discuss the origins of the Theory of Constraints. 
  • Examine its philosophy and governing principles. 
  • Describe its applications. 
  • Walk through its Five Focusing Steps. 
  • Study some examples, and review typical results. 
  • Examine the relationship between the Theory of Constraints and Critical Chain Program Management

Six Sigma is a disciplined, data-driven approach and methodology for identifying and removing the causes of defects (errors) and minimizing variability in manufacturing and business processes. It uses a set of quality management methods, including statistical methods, and creates a special infrastructure of people within the organization ("Champions", "Black Belts", "Green Belts", "Yellow Belts", etc.) who are experts in these methods. This module will:

  • Define Six Sigma and discuss its origin and evolution.
  • Describe how it differs from Lean and Six Sigma. 
  • Explain how sigma levels are determined, and how they are used to indicate process capability. 
  • Describe the roles of Six Sigma team members.
  • Discuss key factors of Six Sigma success.
  • Discuss important elements of the Six Sigma process, including key inputs and outputs and the role of "Critical to Xs".
  • Describe the five phases of the DMAIC improvement cycle.

Pareto analysis is a formal technique useful where many possible courses of action are competing for attention. In essence, the problem-solver estimates the benefit delivered by each action, then selects a number of the most effective actions that deliver a total benefit reasonably close to the maximal possible one. This module will:

  • Explain how to create a Pareto Chart, including a cumulative relative frequency line. 
  • Given data and a Pareto Chart, describe how to use a variable to weight the original data and produce another Pareto Chart. 
  • Discuss how to use stratification methods to perform in depth Pareto analysis of the data.
  • Explain how to interpret a Pareto Chart to make a business decision

SIPOC is a tool that summarizes the inputs and outputs of one or more processes in table form. The acronym SIPOC stands for suppliers, inputs, process, outputs, and customers which form the columns of the table. This module will:

Define SIPOC and describe its components.
Discuss the purpose of SIPOC.
Explain how to construct a SIPOC diagram.
Describe how the information gained from a SIPOC analysis can be used.

Control Charts are a tool for distinguishing between the two types of variation causes (Common Cause and Special Cause). They are used to determine if a manufacturing or business process is in a state of statistical control. This module will:

  • Define Control Charts and discuss their purpose.
  • Explain how to determine whether to use an Attribute or a Variables Control Chart.
  • Describe the steps for setting up a Control Chart.
  • Discuss the basic rules for using Control Charts.
  • Explain how to identify which Control Chart type is most appropriate for monitoring a given process parameter

This module will:

  • Explain how to determine data normality and understand possible causes of non-normal data.
  • Show how to select appropriate tests for nonparametric data and how to interpret nonparametric test statistics.
  • Describe the purpose of transforming data and some of the techniques used to transform data.

The last phase of the DMAIC process is Control. Once a solution has been selected and implemented, the team must make sure that the process improvements will be sustained in the future, and the people or system, will not revert to the old way of doing things. The purpose of the Control phase is to maintain a stable and predictable process that meets customer requirements; to make adjustments to meet any changing business requirements, and close the project. This module will:

  • Discuss the purpose of the Control phase in a Lean Six Sigma DMAIC project.
  • Walk through the steps for controlling the process.
  • Describe the basic elements of a Control Plan, discuss its importance, and explain how to create and implement it.
  • Describe the key components required for effectively closing the project, including documentation, handoff, and leverage.

This module will:

  • Understand the purpose of regression.
  • Perform Simple or Multiple Regression and explain.
  • Assumptions. • Measures of Fit: s, R, R2 and R2 adj.
  • Regression Diagnostics.
  • Influential Observations.
  • Students will learn how to select the best model based on these criteria. • Common mistakes – what can go wrong

Statistics is the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting information. Statistics consists of methods and procedures to reduce a lot of data into a more manageable form. This module will: 

  • Introduce some basic terminology used in statistics.
  • Identify the different kinds of data and ways to gather or collect the data.
  • Teach ways to organize information into a manageable form for the purpose of making informed decisions.

This module will:

  • Define Design of Experiments (DOE). 
  • Describe its purpose, importance, and benefits.
  • Define key terms associated with DOE. 
  • Explain how to conduct a well-designed statistical experiment. • Describe the five phases used for applying DOE.

This module will: Illustrate two types of simple comparative experiments - the completely randomized design and the randomized block design. 

  • Define a full factorial experiment.
  • Show how to calculate the main and interaction effects. 
  • Demonstrate how to analyze the results of a full factorial design.
  • Explain the role of replication. 
  • Describe the threats to statistical validity of a designed experiment.

It is not easy to use data in its raw form to make decisions. Data needs to be organized, summarized, and displayed so that the results can be presented. This module will:

  • Describe techniques for displaying data in various tabular or graphical formats.
  • Show how to interpret and answer questions about the data, whether qualitative or quantitative.

In statistics, a central tendency (or, more commonly, a measure of central tendency) is a central value or a typical value for a probability distribution. It is occasionally called an average or just the center of the distribution. The most common measures of central tendency are the arithmetic mean, the median and the mode. A central tendency can be calculated for either a finite set of values or for a theoretical distribution, such as the normal distribution. This module will:

  • Discuss the three measures of central tendency: mean, median, and mode.
  • Describe how to estimate the relationship of the median and the mean, based upon the shape of the histogram.
  • Explore how changes to the original data affect the mean, median, and mode.
  • Calculate estimates for the median and mean and how to identify the modal class.

Measures of dispersion quantitatively express the degree of variation or dispersion of values in a population or in a sample. Common examples of measures of statistical dispersion are the variance, standard deviation and interquartile range. This module will:

  • Calculate measures of dispersion such as range, variance, and standard deviation.
  • Explain how a change in dispersion will affect the shape of the histogram.
  • Demonstrate how a transformation made to the original data affects the standard deviation.
  • Explain how to estimate the percentage of measurements within a specified interval of the mean.
  • Calculate the Z score for a stated measurement.

This module will:

  • Explain how to determine the probability of simple events and compound events.
  • Describe the difference between events that are mutually exclusive and those that are not.
  • Define conditional and unconditional probabilities, and what is meant by statistically independent events.
  • Demonstrate how to calculate combinations and permutations.

Mapping the Process is a way to visually represent the sequence of actions that comprise a process. It helps to document, analyze, and improve on processes. This module will:

  • Define a process and a process map. 
  • Describe the benefits of process mapping. 
  • Describe the differences between relationship maps, swim lane charts, and process maps. 
  • Discuss the three levels of detail used to describe a complex process. 
  • Walk through the five steps of process mapping.
  • Demonstrate how to apply a process map.

Discrete Random Variables
This module will:

  • Explain what a random variable is, and distinguish between discrete and continuous random variables.
  • Describe the properties of a discrete probability distribution.
  • Calculate the mean, or expected value, and standard deviation.

This module will:

  • Discuss how the overall cost of quality relates to both the cost of poor quality and the cost of good quality. 
  • Define the Cost of Poor Quality (COPQ) and identify components of COPQ as they relate to the process. 
  • Explain how to calculate the Cost of Poor Quality. 
  • Identify the benefits derived by a company when they are able to reduce COPQ.

This module will:

  • Describe the characteristics of the normal probability distribution including the shape, central tendency, and dispersions.
  • Describe how the standard deviation affects the shape of the normal distribution.
  • Explain how to use sample data and a normal curve to predict the proportion of product which meets customer requirements.
  • Explain how to use a normal curve to estimate the capability of a process.

A measurement systems analysis (MSA) is a specially designed experiment that seeks to identify the components of variation in the measurement. Just as processes that produce a product may vary, the process of obtaining measurements and data may have variation and produce defects. A measurement systems analysis evaluates the test method, measuring instruments, and the entire process of obtaining measurements to ensure the integrity of data used for analysis (usually quality analysis) and to understand the implications of measurement error for decisions made about a product or process. This module will:

  • Identify the characteristics of a good measurement system. 
  • Identify the benefits of using a Gauge R&R study to validate the measurement system. 
  • Discuss the steps used to conduct a Gauge R&R study. 
  • Use the results of the Gauge R&R study to determine how effective the measurement system is.

This module will:

  • Distinguish between the use of descriptive and inferential statistics.
  • Explain the concept of using a confidence interval to estimate a population parameter.
  • Identify when hypothesis testing may be appropriate and explain the methodology as it relates to a scenario.

Cause and effect means that an action or event will produce a reaction or response in the form of another event. Cause and effect diagrams are used for root cause analysis of what factors are creating the risks within the project. The goal is to identify and treat the root of the problem, not the symptom. This module will:

  • Explain the three basic steps for identifying and preventing problems. 
  • Apply basic cause and effect principles in order to identify the root cause of a problem. 
  • Teach techniques for gathering information for cause and effect analysis, including Five Whys and Brainstorming. 
  • Organize data and information for analysis using the Affinity Diagram and the Fishbone (or Ishikawa) Diagram.
  • Analyze a process using Root Cause Analysis and The XY Matrix

In this module, we will explain the purpose of hypothesis testing and show how to interpret the results of various hypothesis tests. 

  • Discuss the relationship between probability and p-value.
  • Describe how to state the null hypothesis and the alternative hypothesis when provided with a test scenario.
  • Explain how to select the proper hypothesis test to use, based on data type.
  • Conduct several hypothesis tests for continuous and discrete data

Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a systematic technique for failure analysis. An FMEA is often the first step of a system reliability study. It involves reviewing as many components, assemblies, and subsystems as possible to identify failure modes, and their causes and effects. For each component, the failure modes and their resulting effects on the rest of the system are recorded in a specific FMEA worksheet. This module will:

  • Define FMEA and discuss its use as a project risk assessment tool. 
  • Describe the 10 steps for constructing a process FMEA. 
  • Explain the FMEA scoring criteria. 
  • Discuss how to translate FMEA results into action.

This module will:

  • Review how to use a scatter plot to determine if two variables appear correlated and to what degree.
  • Explain how to calculate the correlation coefficient and the coefficient of determination.
  • Show how regression analysis can be used to predict the value of one variable from another variable by fitting a least squares regression line to the data and judging the validity of the model.
  • Describe how to use information generated by a computer output from a simple linear regression to write the equation of the line and perform predictions based upon the model.

Scatter Diagrams are graphs in which the values of two variables are plotted along two axes. The pattern of the resulting points will reveal if there is any sort of relationship between the variables. This module will:

  • Show how to determine if two variables plotted on a scatter diagram appear to be correlated and to what degree. 
  • How to build a scatter diagram. 
  • How to avoid errors in analyzing scatter diagrams.
  • How to use stratification to further explore the relationship between variables

This module will:

  • Define the differences between a point estimator and a confidence interval.
  • Identify the appropriate steps in computing a confidence interval for a single population mean.
  • Show how to interpret the meaning of the confidence interval for a population mean.
  • Explain the meaning of a sampling distribution for a sample statistic and its relevance in computing a confidence interval for a population parameter.

A process is a unique combination of tools, materials, methods, and people engaged in producing a measurable output; for example a manufacturing line for machine parts. All processes have inherent statistical variability which can be evaluated by statistical methods. The Process Capability is a measurable property of a process to the specification, expressed as a process capability index (e.g., Cpk or Cpm) or as a process performance index (e.g., Ppk or Ppm). The output of this measurement is usually illustrated by a histogram and calculations that predict how many parts will be produced out of specification (OOS). Two parts of process capability are: 1) Measure the variability of the output of a process, and 2) Compare that variability with a proposed specification or product tolerance. This module will:

  • Determine how well a process is able to meet customer requirements by measure of process capability. 
  • Identify when one process is more capable than another. 
  • Distinguish capable from non-capable processes.
  • Identify how sample measurements are used to estimate population values.
  • Determine which Control Chart type is most appropriate for monitoring a particular process parameter.

This module will:

  • Compare two population means and define the difference between independent and dependent samples.
  • Show how to compute an appropriate confidence interval for the difference of two population means for both independent and dependent variables.
  • Interpret the meaning of the confidence interval.
  • Describe how to perform a hypothesis test for the difference of two population means for both independent and dependent samples.

This module will:

  • Compute Cp, Cpk, Pp, and Ppk values for processes using continuous data. 
  • Interpret Cp, Cpk, Pp and Ppk and relate them to a defect level. 
  • Take relevant process information for a process using discrete data.
  • Calculate process assessment measurements.
  • Determine how well processes are meeting customer requirements.
  • Look at a powerful operation metric called Rolled Throughput Yield.

This module will:

  • Explain how to identify the appropriate form of a statistical hypothesis for testing population variances.
  • Show how to perform a hypothesis test for either one or two population variances.
  • Describe the steps for computing a confidence interval for population variance.

Once the real root cause of a problem has been isolated, the team uses the information gathered to creatively generate potential solutions. It then evaluates the alternate solutions, assesses the risks, and makes its selection. This module will:

  • Examine the process of selecting a solution for an improvement project.
  • Discuss how potential savings affect a project’s Return On Investment (or ROI).
  • Describe the purpose and application of common tools used to generate and analyze potential solutions and to assess risk.
  • Explain how all these components come together in the implementation plan

This module will:

  • Identify when the method of ANOVA should be applied.
  • Interpret the results and draw valid statistical conclusions from a completed ANOVA table.
  • Determine the appropriate degrees of freedom and how to calculate the F-values for one-way, two-way, and nested designs.
  • Interpret the results of main effects and interaction plots and draw valid statistical conclusions.

This module will:

  • Define a project.
  • Identify the roles and responsibilities of a Project Manager.
  • Identify the processes involved in Project Management such as: initiating, planning, executing, controlling and closing.
  • Identify the relationship between scope, time and cost and how these factors affect the success and quality of a project.

In this module, you will learn: 

  • How to develop the Project Charter
  • How to Identify the Project Stakeholders
  • The purpose of the Focus Arrow and how it helps us assist with defining “Done Looks Like This”
  • How to create a Priority Matrix that helps us rank the customer’s wants for the project
  • How to create and write a Project Scope Statement

In this module, you will learn:  

  • The purpose of the WBS
  • How to develop the WBS
  • How to use the WBS
  • The various approaches of constructing the WBS
  • The terminology that is involved with the WBS

In this module, you will learn:  

  • Sequential and Simultaneous scheduling concepts
  • Critical Path and Float Time for scheduling project activities
  • Free Float/Slack Time • Gantt Scheduling
  • Network Scheduling e.g. AOA, AON, and Pert Charts

In this module, you will learn: 

  • That Activity is a component of work performed during the course of a project
  • The difference between the types of network diagrams, Activity on Arrow and Activity on Node
  • What Duration is
  • What Dependencies and Predecessor lines are
  • How to compute Early Start (ES), Late Start (LS), Early Finish (EF) and Late Finish (LF) for each node in a schedule
  • How to calculate the Forward and Backward Pass
  • What Critical Path and Float Times are

In this module, you will learn: 

  • How the RACI Chart will help us define and clarify the team member’s role.
  • How the attributes must be met by prospective team members.
  • The definitions of work, duration and elapse time, and how these elements are inter-related when working on a project.
  • How to plug the team members into the project schedule.
  • The four stages (Forming, Storming, Norming and Performing) a group of individuals will go through while developing into a team.
  • The core elements for leading and managing a team

In this module, you will learn: 

  • Useful tools for the Executing Phase
  • How different levels of team member skill or interest may affect the WBS
  • The purpose and use of the Stakeholder Analysis form
  • How to build quality into every step of the project

In this module, you will learn: 

  • How to develop a Communication plan and establish the communication links
  • The purpose and the building of an Earned Value Management chart
  • The purpose of the lines on an Earned Value Management Chart: Planned Value line, Earned Value line and the Actual Cost line
  • The formulas that will help you find: Schedule Variance, Cost Variance, Schedule Performance Index and Cost Performance Index
  • How to build the Critical Ratio Chart and worksheet

In this module, you will learn: 

  • How project changes are approved or rejected
  • The 8 processes a Project Manager must know in order to manage changes to a project
  • An easy method for preparing a project status report

In this module, you will learn:  

  • How to gain agreement that the project is complete
  • The process for handing the project off to the customer
  • What support elements must be closed at the end of the project
  • About closing procurements and negotiated settlements
  • How to hand off a project to an implementation team

This module will:

  • Why the implementation of Lean is vital to the continuous improvement of a healthcare system
  • The basics of the Lean improvement methodology
  • The five key principles of Lean, and how they work in a healthcare environment

This module will:

  • Describe Value Add versus Non-Value Add activities
  • Explain why they are important in a Lean implementation
  • Identify the Eight Wastes and discuss why they are a primary focus during Lean implementation
  • Describe each of the Eight Wastes in detail and give examples

This module will:

  • Introduce 5S plus Safety
  • Describe its overall purpose and benefits in Healthcare.
  • Identify the phases of its process
  • Drill down to discuss key objectives
  • Tools or methods used to reach those objectives, and the benefits achieved

This module will:

  • Define Visual Management and describe its purpose and benefits in healthcare
  • Introduce the three characteristics of Visual Management – Self Explaining, Self Regulating, and Self Improving – and discuss why they are important
  • Describe the difference between Visual Controls and Visual Displays, giving examples of each

This module will:

  • Describe a Current State Value Stream Map, and discuss its purpose
  • Walk through the steps of creating a Current State Value Stream Map
  • Identify commonly used symbols
  • Describe how metrics are collected and represented

This module will:

  • Define a Future State Value Stream Map and describe its purpose
  • Define and calculate Takt Time, and discuss its role in Value Stream Mapping
  • Demonstrate how to analyze a Current State Value Stream Map to create a Future State Value Stream Map
  • Discuss how to enable flow and develop Pull

This module will:

  • Define Standard Work from a Lean perspective
  • Discuss its benefits
  • Explain why it is the basis for improvement
  • Explain how to create, implement and improve Standard Work for healthcare processes

This module will:

  • Define Error Proofing from a Lean perspective
  • Describe the benefits a healthcare organization can expect
  • Discuss how it can improve patient safety and service quality while reducing failures and omissions
  • Understand and be able to apply the 6-Step error proofing process
  • Explain how to implement Error Proofing for healthcare processes

This module will:

  • Define Kaizen Event and discuss its purpose and application
  • Explain how Kaizen Events can provide rapid organizational benefits and accelerate the execution of larger initiatives
  • Walk you through the structured approach for running Kaizen Events in healthcare processes

This module will:

  • Describe how Lean Workplace Design differs from traditional approaches
  • Discuss its benefits to a healthcare organization
  • Show how it is used to improve quality and reduce lead times
  • Explain how to create effective Workplace Design for Healthcare processes

This module will:

  • Define Continuous or One Piece Flow and the introductory aspects of Pull Systems
  • Explain where to implement Pull Systems, discuss how they enable effective flow of information and materials, and identify which tools are best suited for various office and healthcare environments
  • Explain how to apply Pull Systems in a comprehensive and systematic way
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